Table of Contents


ABSTRACT
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
APPENDED PAPERS


1 INTRODUCTION
2 CONTEXTUAL BACKGROUND
3 SCIENTIFIC APPROACH
4 FRAME OF REFERENCE
5 RESEARCH RESULTS
6 DISCUSSION
7 CONCLUSIONS
8 REFLECTIONS


REFERENCES
List of figures





























1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

1.2 Problem definition

1.3 Research goals

1.3.1 Research questions

1.3.2 Industry goal

1.3.3 Scientific goal

1.4 Delimitation and scope

1.5 Disposition of the thesis


2 CONTEXTUAL BACKGROUND

2.1 Process oriented approach to product development control

2.2 Product development responsiveness

2.3 Business environment

2.3.1 Globalization and collaboration

2.3.2 Information technology

2.3.3 Mechatronics and software

2.4 Industrial objectives and problems

2.4.1 Business goals and rationale

2.4.2 Reusable design knowledge

2.4.3 Part based paradigm

2.4.4 Transaction oriented versus state-based

2.4.5 Conceptual design support

2.4.6 Mass customization manufacturing


3 SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

3.1 Design research methodology

3.1.1 Research in design

3.1.2 Experience, knowledge and learning

3.1.3 Action research

3.1.4 Case study

3.1.5 Applied research

3.1.6 Framework for modeling, analysis, and implementation

3.1.7 Conceptual framework for engineering design research

3.2 Research validation

3.2.1 The validation square

3.2.2 Verification and validation of research

3.3 Research approach

3.3.1 Applied research methods

3.3.2 Validation of the results


4 FRAME OF REFERENCE

4.1 Design science

4.1.1 Design theory

4.1.2 Design methodology

4.1.3 Reasoning in design

4.1.4 The function of a design

4.2 Engineering design

4.2.1 Theory of technical systems (TTS) and theory of domains (ToD)

4.2.2 Function-means tree and integrated product model

4.2.3 Requirements, rationales and constraints

4.2.4 Constraint networks

4.3 Systems theory and systems engineering

4.3.1 Systems engineering and systems

4.3.2 Open systems (system theory)

4.3.3 Definition of a system and the first principle of systems

4.3.4 Holistic, synthetic, and organismic

4.3.5 Elaboration and encapsulation

4.3.6 Systems engineering philosophy

4.3.7 Complexity

4.4 Product development

4.4.1 Products and product design

4.4.2 Innovation system and process

4.4.3 Product modularity and platform-based products

4.4.4 The central role of product description

4.5 Product models and product configuration

4.5.1 The generic model of configuration tasks

4.5.2 Configuration using a frame architecture

4.5.3 Product configuration models

4.5.4 Generic structures for product configuration

4.5.5 The generic bill-of-material concept

4.5.6 Architecture of bill-of-material systems

4.6 Manufacturing system development

4.6.1 Systematic development of manufacturing systems

4.6.2 Axiomatic design applied to manufacturing system development

4.6.3 Design of assembly systems for modular products

4.6.4 Flexible manufacturing systems

4.6.5 Petri net based manufacturing system modeling

4.6.6 Component variety, re-use, and commonality in manufacturing processes

4.7 Integrated product model and platform-based development

4.7.1 Analytical target cascading and optimal model-based decomposition

4.7.2 Approaches to design knowledge representation

4.8 Organizational aspects

4.8.1 Types of organizational change

4.8.2 Factors influencing an organizational setting

4.8.3 Different kinds of knowledge


5 RESEARCH RESULTS

5.1 Overview of the research results

5.1.1 Relationship between research topics and presented papers

5.1.2 Contextual foundations of the research results

5.1.3 Conceptual map of topic areas

5.2 Product description

5.2.1 A process model for an integrated product model

5.2.2 The central role of product descriptions

5.2.3 The "invisible" product description

5.2.4 Evolution of product descriptions

5.2.5 Variant bill-of-material and product configuration

5.2.6 Implementation of a new core product description system

5.3 A systems view and configurable components

5.4 Configurable component concept

5.4.1 Introduction

5.4.2 The anatomy of a configurable component

5.4.3 System structure composed of configurable components

5.4.4 Configuration capability and constraints

5.4.5 Self-sufficiency and information hiding

5.4.6 Technology and discipline independent

5.5 A systems view of a product model based on configurable components

5.6 A combined function-means and parametric modeling approach

5.6.1 Operational implementation of the CC as a product definition system

5.6.2 A function-means based method to define configurable components

5.6.3 Structure and part instantiation

5.6.4 A platform design process

5.7 Configurable components for manufacturing system modeling

5.7.1 Relationship between product and manufacturing system models

5.7.2 Taxonomy of manufacturing operations

5.7.3 Manufacturing assembly operations

5.8 Platform-based product development

5.8.1 Challenges for the automotive engineering design community

5.8.2 Variety, commonality, and design bandwidth

5.8.3 Sources of variety and a development method framework

5.8.4 An integrated product model framework


6 DISCUSSION

6.1 Initial research motivations

6.2 The conception of the configurable component concept

6.3 Experiences from the implementation

6.4 Expected effects on product development


7 CONCLUSIONS

7.1 Concluding the research questions

7.2 Evaluating the research work

7.3 Contribution

7.3.1 Scientific contribution

7.3.2 Industrial contribution

7.3.3 Implications of the results


8 REFLECTIONS

8.1 Related work

8.2 Future research

8.2.1 Functional requirements as a source for variation

8.2.2 Mechanisms for interfaces and interactions and function representation

8.2.3 Bridging the gap between engineering disciplines

8.2.4 Boundary spanning communication in the supply chain

8.2.5 Design tool implementation

8.3 A reflection inspired by an open systems dynamics analogy


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